California regulates college sex, in a law just signed by Gov. Brown and applying to campuses that accept state money. Key passages:

It is the responsibility of each person involved in the sexual activity to ensure that he or she has the affirmative consent of the other or others to engage in the sexual activity. … Lack of protest or resistance does not mean consent, nor does silence mean consent. Affirmative consent must be ongoing throughout a sexual activity and can be revoked at any time. The existence of a dating relationship between the persons involved, or the fact of past sexual relations between them, should never by itself be assumed to be an indicator of consent.

Earlier here.

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Texas “Law Hawk”

by Walter Olson on September 30, 2014

More tasteful advertising, this time for a Fort Worth practitioner.

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Free speech roundup

by Walter Olson on September 30, 2014

  • Coverage of Cato Constitution Day panel on First Amendment with Nadine Strossen, P.J. O’Rourke, Eric Rassbach, Ilya Shapiro [Concurring Opinions] And First-Amendment-oriented articles in the latest Cato Supreme Court Review: Judge David Sentelle on freedom of speech as liberty for all and not just for the organized press, Allen Dickerson on McCutcheon v. FEC, Ilya Shapiro on SBA List v. Driehaus, and Trevor Burrus on protest buffer zones;
  • Eric Holder “the worst Attorney General on press freedom issues in a generation, possibly since Richard Nixon’s John Mitchell” [Trevor Timm]
  • “7 Things Cracked Got Wrong About Free Speech” [Greg Lukianoff of FIRE, who has a new short book out entitled "Freedom From Speech"]
  • As ACLU recognizes, Arizona law purportedly banning revenge porn would do more than that [Masnick, Popehat, Greenfield, Sullum/Reason]
  • Critical overview of “media reform” movement led by wildly misnamed pressure group Free Press [Barbara Joanna Lucas, Capital Research Center]
  • In lawsuits against Yelp arising from bad reviews, courts have not been impressed by theory that the service extorts reviewed businesses [Paul Alan Levy; a restaurateur upset at Yelp strikes back in a different way]
  • Proposal to make scientific misconduct a crime “would seem to raise serious First Amendment problems” [Howard Wasserman]

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Spotting their adversaries

by Walter Olson on September 29, 2014

Nicholas Quinn Rosenkranz on the significance of the IRS having targeted for unfavorable scrutiny “organizations involved in….educating on the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.” [Volokh Conspiracy] “Presidents have always sought to push against the constitutional limits of their power; but never have they targeted those who merely teach about such limits.”

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A Connecticut state commission charged with coming up with policy recommendations after the Sandy Hook elementary school massacre is considering a draft proposal that would slap new regulations on homeschooling families. “Parents who home-school children with significant emotional, social or behavioral problems would have to file progress reports prepared by special education program teams” under the scheme. [Connecticut Post]

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GuyFawkesMaskMagnets Zen Magnets, the last producer left standing after the agency vanquished BuckyBalls and its maker, says it will fight in court. [Denver Business Journal, Nancy Nord; picture credit, Zen Magnets Facebook page]

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Law schools roundup

by Walter Olson on September 29, 2014

  • “Is Legal Scholarship Politically Biased?” [Chilton-Posner study] [Caron, Josh Blackman, Will Baude]
  • “Suffolk offers to buy out its whole law faculty” [Bainbridge]
  • Another injury lawyer, Thomas Kline of Kline & Specter, gets a law school named after himself after $50 million donation to Drexel [Philadelphia Inquirer via Caron]
  • Bonus quote from Kline partner and senatorial scion Shanin Specter: “I don’t think there are any lawyers in Philadelphia bringing claims that they know are not meritorious.” (So that’s a relief.) Meanwhile, grateful Drexel law dean praises Kline’s law firm as the one you should consider calling if, “unfortunately, someone in your family faced catastrophic injuries.” [same; compare encomium of Michigan State dean to Geoffrey Fieger upon Fieger's $4 million donation to MSU in 2002]
  • So many fellow academics upset with U. of Chicago’s Brian Leiter and his frequent talk of legal action hasn’t helped [Chronicle of Higher Ed, Jonathan Adler, Leigh Johnson, Above the Law]
  • A law school study group with its own nondisclosure agreement [Patrice, AtL, Lowering the Bar]
  • Assuming we don’t abolish them: “Three Ideas to Improve Law Reviews (as Institutions)” [Dave Hoffman, ConcurOp]
  • Last year I spoke on varied subjects at law schools including Michigan, Buffalo, Chicago, Vermont, Baltimore, Nebraska, and Duquesne. Why not invite me to speak to your roundtable, class or Federalist Society Chapter? Contact editor – at – overlawyered – dot – com.

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Adventures in bankruptcy and other high-stakes litigation. [Stacy Perman, Fortune]

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But what if the alternative for clients is no car at all? [Megan McArdle]

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News reporters, nature lovers, scientists and Western lawmakers are in an uproar over the Forest Service’s plans to finalize a ban on taking photographs in federally designated wilderness areas without permission of the service. A spokeswoman “said the agency was implementing the Wilderness Act of 1964, which aims to protect wilderness areas from being exploited for commercial gain.. … ‘We have to follow the statutory requirements.'” [Oregonian, Coyote and followup, ABA Journal]

Update: Service backs down, at least to the extent of acknowledging that it needs to clarify the scope of the ban.

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At least per this apparently official page from the University of Michigan; one hopes the institution is not planning to incorporate those notions into its (federally shaped) student discipline policies. [College Fix]

P.S. Related on “campus rape culture” furor: Cathy Young/Slate, Coyote, Scott Greenfield.

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In Bristol County, Mass., the force of public prosecution will protect your lawful comings and goings only when the D.A. approves of them [Eugene Volokh on environmentalist blockade case, earlier]

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Don’t

by Walter Olson on September 26, 2014

Don’t yield to the temptation to enhance your “Los Angeles Business Litigation Attorney” website by posting pictures of your image Photoshopped in with celebrities [Svitlana E. Sangary, facing California bar discipline over charges of deceptive advertising and other misconduct; Lowering the Bar

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September 26 roundup

by Walter Olson on September 26, 2014

  • Was California workers’ comp claim against NFL by former Tampa Bay Buccaneer-turned-P.I.-lawyer inconsistent with his mixed martial arts prowess? [Tampa Bay Times, Lakeland Ledger, earlier and more on California workers' comp and professional football]
  • Salt Lake City’s $6,500 stings: “Secret Shopper Hired to Punish Lyft & Uber Actually Prefers Them” [Connor Boyack, Libertas Institute]
  • Are libertarians undermining public accommodations law? (If only.) [Stanford Law Review, Samuel Bagenstos and Richard Epstein via Paul Horwitz]
  • Why NYC is losing its last bed and breakfasts [Crain's New York via @vpostrel]
  • U.S. continues foolish policy of restricting crude oil and gas exports, time for that to change [David Henderson first and second posts]
  • So it seems the New York Times is now committed to the theory that Toyotas show mechanical unintended acceleration;
  • OK, the future Kansas politician was at the strip club strictly on attorney business when the police arrived. Was he billing? [Politico]

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Eric Holder to resign

by Walter Olson on September 25, 2014

Many aspects of Eric Holder’s tenure as Attorney General appalled me. I assume, however, that they reflect conscious policy from higher up and will continue under whoever replaces him. Earlier mentions of Holder here and here.

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Video now out from Save Farm Families on the Hudson Farm case (earlier). Description:

Collateral Damage: Farm Families Under Attack reviews the questionable political and academic actions that enabled the New York-based Waterkeeper Alliance to push forward with its lawsuit against the Hudson family, and the continuing threat that environmental extremists pose to family farmers, not just in Maryland but across the nation.

I wrote about the case here, here, and here. It raises questions of legal ethics (when the mistaken factual basis for a claim is revealed, aren’t the attorneys obliged to withdraw it?), ideological adventurism in the environmental sphere by state-affiliated law schools, and the need for loser-pays. Maryland Attorney General Doug Gansler, who failed in a bid for the Democratic nomination for governor, comes off badly in the video, and America’s Most Irresponsible Public Figure® Robert F. Kennedy, Jr., even worse.

[cross-posted from my Maryland blog Free State Notes; more on RFK Jr.'s latest foray into public discussion, in which the celebrity scion/frothing hothead again demands the incarceration of various persons who take the opposite side from him in environmental controversy]

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Silencing oldies radio?

by Walter Olson on September 25, 2014

Under a potentially far-reaching ruling by a federal judge interpreting California state law, satellite and streaming music services like SiriusXM and Pandora — and maybe bars and restaurants too — could be liable for vast sums for having broadcast pre-1972 recordings without obtaining “public performance” permission under California state law. [Hollywood Reporter's THR Esq; plus a very informative take from Jesse Walker]

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Food roundup

by Walter Olson on September 25, 2014

  • Our posts on the closure of California’s Westover Winery following punitive fines for letting customers volunteer continue to draw interesting comments, including one from a reader identifying himself as William Smyth, owner of the winery;
  • FDA comes out with revised proposed FSMA rules, a preliminary look [AP] Agency only partially backs off restrictions on use of spent brewing grains as animal feed [Elizabeth Brown/Reason, WLF, earlier]
  • “Cottage food” law success: “Texans Created Over A Thousand Local Businesses After Texas Eased Restrictions On Selling Food” [Nick Sibilla, IJ/Forbes]
  • Artisanal salami maker eventually managed to persuade FDA that it should be permitted to ferment product at 72 degrees as the Italians do [WaPo] Craft sausage startup in Detroit “sort of operated under ‘do-things-until-you-get-caught” [Metro Times]
  • Does drinking diet soda make you fat? [Daniel Engber, Slate]
  • Kalona, Iowa maker of squeaky cheese curds cites mounting regulatory costs in decision to close (via Julie Gunlock) [Cedar Rapids Gazette]
  • Bee colonies getting sick: indictment of modern humanity’s interaction with nature? [Timothy Taylor, Conversable Economist]

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