Update: Hager’s bad behavior

Disgraced law professor Mark M. Hager, after being suspended by the District of Columbia bar for a year, at last has resigned his tenured job at American University’s law school, the Washington Post reported in April (James V. Grimaldi, “Hearsay: The Lawyer’s Column”, Washington Post, Apr. 21 (not online); Mary P. Gallagher, “How Not To Settle a Multiparty Suit”, New Jersey Law Journal, May 5 (not online); Julianne Basinger, Jamilah Evelyn, and Katherine S. Mangan, “Suspended Law Professor Loses Tenured Job”, Chronicle of Higher Education”, May 9 (not online). In December the District of Columbia Court of Appeals found Hager “to have engaged in ‘conflicts of interest, dishonesty’ and ‘improper conduct’ when he represented two southern Virginia mothers who wanted to sue the makers of the lice-killing shampoo Nix. The court upheld the D.C. Bar’s one-year suspension of Hager and further ordered him to disgorge the $225,000 fee he shared with co-counsel.” (James V. Grimaldi, “Misconduct in Lice Case Puts AU Professor’s Job in Jeopardy”, Washington Post, Mar. 10). For our earlier coverage of the Hager affair, see Feb. 23, 2000 and May 3, 2001.

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  • Disgraced Law Professor Resigns

    Disgraced law professor Mark M. Hager, after being suspended by the District of Columbia bar for a year, at last has resigned his tenured job at American University’s law school, the Washington Post reported in April . . ….