RFK Jr. vs. thimerosal

by Walter Olson on June 20, 2005

One of America’s least credible public figures, celebrity environmentalist Robert F. Kennedy Jr., wades into the mercury in vaccines/autism controversy (Dec. 29, 2003, earlier posts) with a “special investigation” for Salon and Rolling Stone rehearsing the contentions of anti-thimerosal activists (“Deadly Immunity”, Jun. 16). Orac at Respectful Insolence, who’s covered the controversy extensively, hits back hard here, here and here. Reactions from Salon’s readers are here, and the online magazine has already been obliged to post several corrections of Kennedy’s errors, including the following remarkably embarrassing one:

The article also misstated the level of ethylmercury received by infants injected with all their shots by the age of six months. It was 187 micrograms — an amount 40 percent, not 187 times, greater than the EPA’s limit for daily exposure to methylmercury.

More: Skeptico (Jun. 20) challenges RFK Jr.’s account of a supposedly hush-hush meeting of vaccine scientists held outside Atlanta (via Adler, the Corner).

{ 4 comments }

1 The Commons Blog 06.22.05 at 9:40 am

RFK Jr. & Thimerosal

The Huffington Post and other sites are buzzing about RFK Jr’s “investigation” of a purported link between Thimerosal in vaccines and autism. Respectful Insolence’s ORAC, himself a scientist and academic surgeon, is wholly unimpressed (see also here). …

2 The Commons Blog 06.23.05 at 10:55 am

RFK Jr. & Thimerosal

The Huffington Post and other sites are buzzing about RFK Jr’s “investigation” of a purported link between Thimerosal in vaccines and autism. Respectful Insolence’s ORAC, himself a scientist and academic surgeon, is wholly unimpressed (see also here). …

3 PointOfLaw Forum 10.19.05 at 12:05 am

David C. Johnson and the Commonweal Institute

Last year, the LawPundit blog was especially impressed by a speech David C. Johnson gave to ATLA. In it, he makes the standard litany of accusations of a right-wing conspiracy, with the devastating tag line that, when it comes to…

4 Overlawyered 02.23.06 at 9:40 am

A vaccine database, contaminated

The federal government has established something called a Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System to collect reports of possible side effects related to immunizations. Sounds like a useful tool for epidemiological study, right? Except that, it…

Comments on this entry are closed.