“Hooters Sued for Weight Discrimination”

by Walter Olson on May 27, 2010

The complainant says management proposed to place her on “weight probation” when she had trouble fitting into her uniform at the winks-and-wings eatery. She’s suing under Michigan discrimination law, which is unusual in making weight a protected category. [WSJ Law Blog]

{ 9 comments }

1 BJC 05.27.10 at 5:02 pm

The District of Columbia bans discrimination based on “personal appearance,” which I think means the same thing.

2 Bill Poser 05.27.10 at 8:00 pm

Isn’t a certain appearance a requirement of the job and therefore an exception in such a case?

3 Frank C ostanza 05.28.10 at 8:02 am

In reporting this case on his tallk show, Jay Leno first showed the girl being interviewed. She, at least to my eye, she was a fine example of properly-formed feminity. Then Leno next showed the manager, who explained his complaint. The manager was an incredibly rotund man who obviously never saw an exercise class he liked.

4 Jack Wilson 05.28.10 at 9:07 am

We are heading toward the European model – where you can never fire anybody.

We need to get back to the ‘at will’ principle, enough of this phony discrimination/civil rights crap.

5 Rliyen 05.28.10 at 9:12 am

But, isn’t Michigan an “At-Will” State as it is?

6 Jack Olson 05.28.10 at 9:46 am

Hooter’s is afraid to show its customers what happens to you if you eat their junk food.

7 Todd Rogers 05.28.10 at 1:46 pm

Me predicts this case isn’t about a weight issue. I’d bet money that there’s something else going on here and this lawsuit is the result of some other private dispute.

8 Jackie Chiles 05.28.10 at 2:06 pm

Mr. Costanza – If Hooters’ business model involved hiring buff male managers to attract customers, you might have a point. It doesn’t, so you don’t.

9 Chris Hoey 05.31.10 at 12:19 pm

How many potential Hooters’ customers go there to ogle the managers? It may be a sagacious ploy on the part of management to minimize sexual harassment claims from spurned females by requiring being unappealing as a condition of eligibility for management.

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