May 27 roundup

by Walter Olson on May 27, 2010

{ 5 comments }

1 Anonymous Attorney 05.27.10 at 9:52 am

Of course Volokh is pleased with Kozinski’s opinion… he’s cited in it! A mutual admiration society.

I do like the result. Another pressing question is the extent to which employees (whether public, like Walter Kehowski, or private, like a law firm associate) are protected from firing for speaking out on controversial issues. What if the college had fired Kehowski for his politically incorrect e-mails? I see there’s some protection there — can’t fire public employees for speaking on a matter of public importance — but it’s not always clear. A state trooper who sends an un-PC e-mail can get fired. The NYPD has internal regulations saying its members can’t associate, even off-duty, with “racism” or something similar. But I’m confident that belonging to an all-black officers group wouldn’t get you in any trouble. Equal protection problem?

I’ve worked in offices where black pride, Puerto Rican pride, etc. knick-knacks abound, but imagine putting up a small Confederate flag or even a celtic cross.

2 Patrick 05.27.10 at 5:21 pm

It appears that some Wikipedia editor reads this site. Your biography is up to date as I read it.

Except for the parts about contra dancing.

3 Walter Olson 05.27.10 at 5:24 pm

I am impressed. Mentioning Wikipedia gets results.

4 William Nuesslein 05.28.10 at 8:49 am

Some years ago I asked Dorothy Rabinowitz to investigate the Catholic priest furor. She did wonderful work about the day care center hysteria with her book “No Crueler Tyrannies”. Unfortunately she disagreed with my proposition that none of the allegations against the priests was valid.

Two trials for the priests were covered by Court TV. One, for Father Shanley, was based on a discredited expert and repressed memories. The testimony in his trial had the same fantastic elements as documented by Ms. Rabinowitz.

The other trial was of father Geoghan. “He was found guilty in January 2002 of indecent assault and battery for grabbing the buttocks of a 10-year-old boy in a swimming pool at the Waltham Boys and Girls Club in 1991, and was sentenced to nine to ten years in prison.” He was murdered in prison.

If the carefully selected cases did not show guilt, how can any claim be trusted?

There was an unfortunate change to statue of limitations that allowed lawyers to open settle cases and clean the clock of the Catholic Church. The suggestions, fraud and was obvious. But too many overlooked the defects in the claims and obliterated rules of evidence to have a massive, and disgusting, exorcism. This is a dark time in American History.

5 Ron Coleman 06.01.10 at 11:46 am

I hate when Wikipedia doesn’t track my career moves.

Though I can hardly blame them, actually.

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