“Woman left sleeping on plane sues airline”

The latest lawsuit from Geoffrey Fieger raises the question whether the sort of mildly embarrassing episode you might once have dined out on for a few weeks now qualifies as something you should be able to retire on. Kevin Underhill wonders too.

11 Comments

  • Ok, it actually is the flight attendants job to make sure everyone gets off the plane, so… this is definitely a disciplinary offense, maybe even a firing one considering its something of a security breach. Lawsuit worthy, though…?

  • She slept through the landing? Unless she’s going to admit to being drugged or something, I’d like to know the names of the flight crew; I’d book with them anytime.

  • IANAL but if you sue you have to claim damages. What damages did she suffer? There was an interview with her of Fox News. I am being kind when I say the woman is a ditz. She had no idea why she was suing or what damages she was suing for. I am sure this lawsuit is Geoffrey Fieger’s idea. He hasn’t made a fool of himself lately so this is his chance.

  • She was able to sleep in a coach seat? Something’s fishy about this story!

  • Though she used her phone to check the time, she said didn’t think of calling for help, she said.

    I question this woman’s judgment.

  • Settle out of court for $1.

    Then sic the TSA on her. Clearly a security risk.

  • The airline should counterclaim for trespass.

  • Feiger’s the attorney?

    Summary judgement: defendant.

  • I watched her interview on Fox News. It did not go well.

  • Early one morning a few years pre-9/11 I was en route to St. Louis to meet a connection to New York and I slept thru the landing at St Louis. There was a flight crew change at St Louis which didn’t help. In fact I did not awaken until we were on approach to O’Hare. After a few minutes with the ticket agent at O’Hare, I found myself holding a first-class boarding pass to New York. End of problem. btw I am 6’4” and had no trouble sleeping at the back of a DC-9 in coach.

  • As a student I was twice locked into Widener library at Harvard when I failed to hear the closing bell and had to make my way down those great stairs in the dark. I eventually found janitors in the basement who let me out. I consider this a badge of honor rather than the basis for a lawsuit.