September 20 roundup

by Walter Olson on September 20, 2010

  • “Family sues for $25 million over death of Virginia Beach homeless man” [Pilot Online]
  • New paper proposes voucherizing indigent criminal defense [Stephen Schulhofer and David Friedman, Cato Institute, more]
  • “Why the Employee Free Choice Act Has, and Should, Fail” [Richard Epstein, SSRN]
  • Free-market lawprofs file brief in class action arbitration case, Concepcion v. AT&T [PoL]
  • Enactment of Dodd-Frank law results in flood of whistleblower-suit leads for plaintiff’s bar [Corporate Counsel, ABA Journal] “Will Whistle-Blowing Be Millions Well Spent?” [Perlis/Chais, Forbes]
  • Sept. 28 in House: “Congressional Hearing on the Problems of Overcriminalization” [NACDL]
  • Abusive-litigation angle seen in NYC mosque controversy [Painter, Legal Ethics Forum]
  • Snark alert: Mr. Soros does something nice for Human Rights, and Human Rights does something nice for him [Stoll]

{ 8 comments }

1 Bob Lipton 09.20.10 at 8:22 am

Maybe they should pass some laws on overcriminalization with mandated sentencing and zero tolerance.

Bob

2 Jack Wilson 09.20.10 at 10:24 am

The family that wants $25 million for the dead homeless guy – would they settle for say, $10 million?

3 robozo 09.20.10 at 11:40 am

“He was not a perfect man, but he was a good man,” he said. “And he is missed by all of our family members.”
Too bad none could put their old man up for the night on the couch.

4 Anonymous Attorney 09.20.10 at 12:18 pm

Re: Soros v. the Koch Brothers:

Great find! The notion that politically liberal giving is “selfless” and “pure” as compared to conservative activism is, to my mind, bunk. People have their values, and they want to see them advanced, plain and simple. It’s hard to believe that the Koch Brothers really financially benefit in any noticeable way from seeking lower government taxes generally.

Meanwhile, a figure like Soros gets plenty from his “selfless giving”: if he sees the advancement of liberal causes as generally beneficial to his particular ethnic group (Jewish), it’s not really all that “selfless.” Peruse the initiatives of the Soros Foundation and see if they don’t match up to the writing of Professor Kevin MacDonald in this regard. If this is how he chooses to spend his billions, that’s one thing — but forgive me if I forgo the genuflections.

5 Jack Wilson 09.20.10 at 12:20 pm

robozo, good point. I think this is an example of what we used to call ‘unmitigated gall’.

6 Richard Nieporent 09.21.10 at 10:51 am

Meanwhile, a figure like Soros gets plenty from his “selfless giving”: if he sees the advancement of liberal causes as generally beneficial to his particular ethnic group (Jewish), it’s not really all that “selfless.”

Yes he does support leftist causes but not his ethnic group. He is just announced a donation of $100 Million dollars to Human Rights Watch. This is an organization that continuously attacks Israel and supports the Palestinians.

7 Doug 09.21.10 at 7:59 pm

Can’t believe I am going to say this, but liability seems solid with the garbage truck and the homeless man. I was asleep in a chair during the day covered with a bright blue blanket. The driver has had other diving related problems in the past. The only issue is how much is a homeless man worth? Turns out, it could be quite amount.

8 William Nuesslein 09.23.10 at 8:15 am

The average Joe grosses $2 million over his lifetime ($50,000 X 40 years) So the $25 million to the family of the homeless man is equivalent to providing 10 slaves.

There was a claim that the homeless man was dehumanized. I wonder how that was done. The driver’s past record would be relevant only if it was related to the accident per se. The driver was not drinking or texting at time of the accident.

I don’t think sovereign immunity would apply in this case as garbage collection is usually a private sector service.

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