Food and agriculture roundup

by Walter Olson on December 8, 2011

  • Steve Chapman on FDA salt reduction initiative [Tribune/syndicated] Canada: “Health minister takes sodium-reduction plan off the table” [Calgary Herald] Flashback: FDA holds first hearing on regulating salt content in food [2007, Medical News Today] Discussion of my piece last week [Adler/Volokh, Instapundit]
  • More on McDonald’s sidestepping of San Francisco would-be Happy Meal ban [Fair Warning, earlier; background here, here, here, here, etc.]
  • “Caveat Venditor: Cottage Food Laws Great in Theory, Often Less So in Practice” [Baylen Linnekin of pro-freedom Keep Food Legal, who guestblogged at Reason last week]
  • Rather than get government out of way, left’s farm bill (“Local Farms, Food and Jobs Act”) would cut small/local/organic growers in on more USDA programs [Obama Foodorama, Linnekin]
  • Good riddance to monopoly powers of the Canadian Wheat Board [CBC]
  • Texas now allows home bakers to sell their wares [Austin Chronicle via @pointoflaw]
  • Widespread opposition to new Department of Labor proposal to ban kids from much work on farms [Nebraska Outback]

{ 1 trackback }

Labor law roundup
12.10.11 at 7:26 am

{ 2 comments }

1 Chris Hoey 12.08.11 at 11:10 am

I am glad to see McDonald’s response to the San Francisco’s nanny state law against Happy Meals is working. What is missing is the back story-McDonald’s has been at odds with the city fathers there for decades, which has a past history of a ban against fast food restaurants, not because they were unhealthy, but because they were and are nonunion, a sin in that ultra liberal city by the Bay.

2 gitarcarver 12.08.11 at 1:08 pm

RE: Caveat Venditor, it seems as if the woman in the video wants all the benefits of a commercial license without paying the licensing fee.

$400 for two years is not unreasonable. She talks about a ceiling in what she can do, but really there isn’t. The licensing regulation is limiting her – she is.

The woman just feels she is special and not have to pay the same fees as other businesses. That is fine. I would rather the other businesses not have to pay the fees rather than carve out a special niche for her.

Comments on this entry are closed.