“This seems to be designed for tabloid consumption”

by Walter Olson on October 10, 2013

Should prosecutors hype their charges for publicity value? U.S. District Court Judge Richard Sullivan (S.D.N.Y.) is scathing about a sensationally worded press release put out by the office of Manhattan U.S. Attorney Preet Bharara on bringing corruption charges against two Gotham politicos. The alternative presumably would be to save the colorful language in the name of the public until actually securing a conviction. And by contrast, Mike Koehler quotes comments by Judge Richard Leon on dismissing Africa Sting FCPA cases:

This appears to be the end of a long and sad chapter in the annals of white collar criminal enforcement. Unlike takedown day in Las Vegas, however, there will be no front page story in the New York Times or the Post for that matter tomorrow reflecting the government’s decision today to move to dismiss the charges against the remaining defendants in this case. Funny isn’t it what sells newspapers.

[FCPA Professor] More from Scott Greenfield:

According to the Law360 article, “fellow panel member and deputy U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of New York Richard B. Zabel defended the practice, saying under U.S. Department of Justice guidance, part of the reason to have a press conference or release is to explain to the public what is going on. ‘The purpose of a quote is to be quoted and draw attention to the case,’ Zabel said. “Laypeople can’t read a complaint.”

Is that not a great explanation or what?

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See You In The Funny Papers | Simple Justice
10.11.13 at 8:33 am

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