Comments on: One lesson of the Eich/Mozilla affair http://overlawyered.com/2014/04/one-lesson-eichmozilla-affair/ Chronicling the high cost of our legal system Tue, 21 Oct 2014 20:14:10 +0000 hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.0 By: Richard Nieporent http://overlawyered.com/2014/04/one-lesson-eichmozilla-affair/comment-page-1/#comment-277887 Thu, 10 Apr 2014 16:57:44 +0000 http://overlawyered.com/?p=45069#comment-277887 Brandeis University withdraws honorary degree offer to Ayaan Hirsi Ali

http://www.foxnews.com/us/2014/04/09/brandeis-university-withdraws-planned-honorary-degree-for-islam-critic-ayaan/

Another mob claims another victim.

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By: Allan http://overlawyered.com/2014/04/one-lesson-eichmozilla-affair/comment-page-1/#comment-277677 Wed, 09 Apr 2014 19:51:40 +0000 http://overlawyered.com/?p=45069#comment-277677 Mr. Nieporent,

This is a joke, right? People all over the world for likely as long as there have been people in the world have justifyied disrespect for the rule of law by electing terrorists, hiring felons for jobs, lending felons money, and hiring felons’ companies to provide services.

How else do you explain how G. Gordon Liddy ever got his own talk show? Sure, Mr. Liddy did not bomb anyone. He only participated in a conspiracy that almost took down the constitution, and, for better or worse, ensured Jimmy Carter got elected. (which result was worse depends on your point of view, I guess).

Many avowed terrorists have become stalwarts and world leaders. Examples of such include Nelson Mandela, Yitzhak Shamir, Tito, and (perhaps) George Washington. I am sure I could come up with more examples if given the chance, both on the left and the right, recent and past. As Seth and Amy would ask: “really”? Are you really suggesting that, for example, the Maquis should not have been employed after WWII? They were certainly terrorists, and I doubt they repented.

I think you are engaging in moral relativity, with your moral compass being all that matters. This is fine and dandy by me, because it is your compass, not mine.

As the cliche goes, “One man’s terrorist is another man’s freedom
fighter”.

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By: Richard Nieporent http://overlawyered.com/2014/04/one-lesson-eichmozilla-affair/comment-page-1/#comment-277614 Wed, 09 Apr 2014 14:47:58 +0000 http://overlawyered.com/?p=45069#comment-277614 Walter, you are correct that the statement is a generalization on my part. Of course not everyone on the Left believes that they are heroes. However, how do you explain the fact that these unrepentant terrorists were hired by top universities to be professors of law and education if the vast majority of Leftists didn’t believe that they were correct in their actions? How could a university hire a convicted terrorist to teach Law? No rational person could justify such disrespect for the rule of law. The only explanation is that since they were against the war in Vietnam any actions they took to oppose the war were justified including bombings and murder. That does not say much for Leftists if they cannot distinguish between opposition to the war and terrorism. By the way, when I use the term Leftist I am not talking about liberals.

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By: Walter Olson http://overlawyered.com/2014/04/one-lesson-eichmozilla-affair/comment-page-1/#comment-277598 Wed, 09 Apr 2014 13:17:18 +0000 http://overlawyered.com/?p=45069#comment-277598 RN> the truth is that the Left thinks that Bernardine Dohrn, Bill Ayers, and Kathy Boudin are heroes.

So as not to turn into just another political board, might this not be a good time to acknowledge that most generalizations about what “the Left” or “the Right” believes are at best inaccurate? Some on the Left consider Dohrn, Ayers and Boudin to be heroes. Others on the Left see them as people who did terrible things for which they have not shown enough remorse. You could just as readily play Salon and depict “the Right” as believing some revolting thing that in reality is believed only by a nutty fringe. Why don’t we just stop?

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By: Richard Nieporent http://overlawyered.com/2014/04/one-lesson-eichmozilla-affair/comment-page-1/#comment-277503 Wed, 09 Apr 2014 03:23:33 +0000 http://overlawyered.com/?p=45069#comment-277503 However, I would never advocate a boycott of any artist, no matter how much I dislike their political views.

Allan, That is my position. I can’t make it any clearer than that.

If they want to make political statements then, of course they will antagonize some people who will refuse to buy their records or go to their movies. However, those are individual choices by individual people. You cannot force people to buy their records and movies.

That some individuals would rather spend their money on artists they like as opposed to artists they dislike is just a statement of fact. It has nothing to do with being legitimate or illegitimate.

With respect to your unrepentant Weather Underground miscreants? (try murders) you could use Google to find out about them. However, I will save you the time.

Kathy Boudin is an American far left radical who was convicted in 1984 of felony murder for her participation in an armed robbery that resulted in the killing of two police officers and a security guard. She was released from prison in 2003. She is currently an adjunct professor at Columbia University.

The lovely couple, Bernardine Dohrn and Bill Ayers, turned themselves in to authorities in 1980. While some charges relating to their activities with the Weathermen were dropped due to prosecutorial misconduct, Dohrn pled guilty to charges of aggravated battery and bail jumping, for which she was put on probation. After refusing to testify against ex-Weatherman Susan Rosenberg in an armed robbery case, she served just less than a year of jail time.

After the Greenwich Village townhouse explosion in 1970, in which Weatherman member Ted Gold, Ayers’s close friend Terry Robbins, and Ayers’s girlfriend, Diana Oughton, were killed when a nail bomb being assembled in the house exploded, Ayers and several associates evaded pursuit by U.S. law enforcement officials. Kathy Boudin and Cathy Wilkerson survived the blast. Ayers was not facing criminal charges at the time, but the federal government later filed charges against him. Ayers participated in the bombings of New York City Police Department headquarters in 1970, the United States Capitol building in 1971, and the Pentagon in 1972, as he noted in his 2001 book, Fugitive Days.

I was going to say that the Left thinks that Brendon Eich’s “crimes” are much worse than theirs. However, the truth is that the Left thinks that Bernardine Dohrn, Bill Ayers, and Kathy Boudin are heroes.

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By: Curmudgeonly Ex-Clerk http://overlawyered.com/2014/04/one-lesson-eichmozilla-affair/comment-page-1/#comment-277502 Wed, 09 Apr 2014 03:12:44 +0000 http://overlawyered.com/?p=45069#comment-277502 Allan,

Without going back and examining the constitutional text, my understanding of the evolution of the secret ballot in the U.S. is that secrecy is not constitutionally required. (I recall a Colorado federal district court so holding in 2012.) So, do you have any objection to requiring voting by open ballot and then permitting third parties to use this publicly available information to punish voters for their choices? If not, why not? Is use of publicly available information regarding political contributions to demand another’s resignation or firing from an unrelated job more like the preceding voting example or more like consumers declining to buy Dixie Chick albums based on the bands’ statements at concerts?

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By: Allan http://overlawyered.com/2014/04/one-lesson-eichmozilla-affair/comment-page-1/#comment-277461 Tue, 08 Apr 2014 21:29:58 +0000 http://overlawyered.com/?p=45069#comment-277461 Mr. Nieporent,

I assumed correctly, except about the unrepentant Weather Underground miscreants (were they ever convicted? If so, they were convicted felons).

I am a bit confused about your point. You seem to think it legitimate that people not buy artists’ records because they are antagonized by the artists’ political views, but you seem to think it illegitimate for a group of people to call for firing a CEO whose views antagonizes them.

I am just wondering about the underlying principle.

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By: Richard Nieporent http://overlawyered.com/2014/04/one-lesson-eichmozilla-affair/comment-page-1/#comment-277460 Tue, 08 Apr 2014 21:04:48 +0000 http://overlawyered.com/?p=45069#comment-277460 I guess I can assume that you do not mind watching Jane Fonda movies, did not support the boycott of the Dixie Chicks, and think it would be a shame if people refused to buy Ted Nugent records. You also think that we should not concern ourselves with the University of Chicago employing Bill Ayers.

Which one of these things is not like the other, Allan? Yes I think we should concern ourselves with the University of Illinois at Chicago (not the University of Chicago) employing Bill Ayers as a professor of education. And for that matter for Columbia employing Kathy Boudin as a professor of social work, and for NYU making her the Rose Sheinberg Scholar-In-Residence at the New York University School of Law, and for Northwestern University employing Bernardine Dohrn as a professor of law. These people are all unrepentant Weather Underground terrorists. Do you not see a difference between them and Brendon Eich. He has not broken any laws. They have. Unfortunately the fact that there were all terrorists seems to be the reason that they were hired.

As for the rest of your list, they are public figures that make their living directly from the public. If they want to make political statements then, of course they will antagonize some people who will refuse to buy their records or go to their movies. However, those are individual choices by individual people. You cannot force people to buy their records and movies.

However, I would never advocate a boycott of any artist, no matter how much I dislike their political views. If other people like their music and acting, and are not put off by their political views, then they should be free to purchase their records and movies. How hard is it for you to understand that?

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By: asdfasdf http://overlawyered.com/2014/04/one-lesson-eichmozilla-affair/comment-page-1/#comment-277447 Tue, 08 Apr 2014 19:14:37 +0000 http://overlawyered.com/?p=45069#comment-277447 These articles underplay or ignore the importance of Eich and his work to the entire modern commercial internet. Virtually every major commercial website, including OkCupid, relies on JavaScript (which Eich designed and implemented). JavaScript is the best of the client-side web technologies, outlasting Flash and Java, it’s two main competitors. Eich also helped found Mozilla, which has had deep and broad impact on most modern browsers. He is literally one of the key architects of the Web.

The ingratitude and hostility aimed at Eich, who gave away his work and created tens or hundreds of billions of dollars in value, is astonishing. Even if one does disagree with his stance on Proposition 8, he deserves respect and courtesy for his work.

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By: Allan http://overlawyered.com/2014/04/one-lesson-eichmozilla-affair/comment-page-1/#comment-277445 Tue, 08 Apr 2014 19:04:14 +0000 http://overlawyered.com/?p=45069#comment-277445 Mr. Nieporent,

I guess I can assume that you do not mind watching Jane Fonda movies, did not support the boycott of the Dixie Chicks, and think it would be a shame if people refused to buy Ted Nugent records. You also think that we should not concern ourselves with the University of Chicago employing Bill Ayers.

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