She came to stay: nanny won’t leave couple’s home

Upland, Calif.: “A California family is stumped about what to do with a live-in nanny they say refuses to work, refuses to be fired and refuses to leave. In fact, Marcella Bracamonte claims that the nanny, Diane Stretton, has threatened to sue the family for wrongful firing and elder abuse.” Stretton’s hiring agreement with the Bracamontes entitles her to room and board as part of her compensation, but she now indicates that she is suffering a disability and stays mostly in her room, the couple says. After the dispute arose the Bracamontes discovered that Stretton is on the state vexatious-litigants list and has been involved in at least 36 lawsuits; police say because Stretton is in residence it is a civil matter, but a judge threw out the couple’s initial eviction attempt, saying they had not filled out a quit notice correctly. [ABC News, auto-plays video ad; CBS Los Angeles] In September of last year, whether coincidentally or not, California Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law the so-called California Domestic Workers’ Bill of Rights, affording domestic workers substantially more legal leverage in disputes with their employers. [SCPR] (& Scott Greenfield, with commenters)


  • What happens when a vexatious lady is hired to be the nanny? Looks like I just got a new idea for a wacky sitcom. Oh yeah!

  • Shades of Bartleby the Scrivener.

  • a judge threw out the couple‚Äôs initial eviction attempt, saying they had not filled out a quit notice correctly.

    You’ve got to fill out the paperwork right.

  • If you are a Netflix subscriber, check out “The Man Who Came to Dinner”, by George Kaufman.

  • […] to leave her in-home living quarters after a falling out with the family that hired her, see this post last month. A February post raised the question of whether AirBnB visitors staying in units in San Francisco, […]