Posts Tagged ‘about the site’

Blog slowdown (updated)

[Originally posted Feb. 25 and carried forward to Mar. 3] I’m slowing down the pace at Overlawyered while I attend to some personal matters. (Update: I’m recovering from surgery, which went well.) Comments moderation should now be back close to normal, but posting itself will remain at a lower volume through maybe the middle of March, depending on circumstances, as I rest and recuperate.

Our new site design

We’ve overhauled our design (thanks, Jeremy Kolassa and colleagues at Cato) to a cleaner and more up-to-date look that loads faster, works better on small devices like tablets and phones, and is more social-media-friendly. Tell us what you think in comments or email editor – at – overlawyered – dot – com. We’re still tinkering and implementing details, so your suggestions can make a difference.

Social media notes

If you’re active on Facebook, don’t forget to like Overlawyered’s page there and consider liking my professional page, which has links to new things I’ve written, appearances, etc. I also have a personal page.

Overlawyered is represented on Twitter and so am I. The two accounts have only a little overlap between them; both are aimed at the general reader, and neither is tremendously interactive.

Deterrent effects of this site

Prof. Stephen Bainbridge, writing at his site the evening before last:

I had a slip and fall at a restaurant tonight after Christmas Eve dinner. (No. It’s not what you’re thinking. I had only had two beers. It was dark and the step was hard to see.) The manager freaked and then double freaked when I mentioned I was a lawyer. My first thought was “payday!” Mega-settlement baby.

But my second thought was that it was just a scraped knee and injured pride. And then my third thought was about all those nasty things I’ve said about trial lawyers over the years. And then my fourth thought was that I’d end up as a story on Walter Olson’s Overlawyered blog! And my final thought was I’d never be able to hold my head up around my tort reform pals again!

So I’m just going to put some ice on it and forget about it.

August 21 roundup

  • “Brady Campaign loses lawsuit against Armslist (a gun classified ad site)” [Volokh]
  • Train for your bright future in federal employment as a FOIA Denial Officer [Katherine Mangu-Ward]
  • Chamber of Commerce alarmed at rise of class actions in Latin America [Kevin LaCroix/D & O Diary, Chamber report and Brazil sidebar]
  • Dear CBS Los Angeles: it’s okay to show a little skepticism regarding creationist’s claims in employment lawsuit [Skeptical Libertarian]
  • Historic role of guns in black civil rights struggle departs from polite conventional account [Charles E. Cobb, Jr., guestblogging on new book at Volokh: samples one, two, three, four]
  • Ranking law blogs based on their number of Feedly subscribers [Derek Muller; only a few single-author blogs score higher]
  • At the height of county fair season, it’s depressing to read about 4-H suits [Legal Geeks]

Comments lost

Like Lois Lerner and so many others in Washington, we’ve suffered a computer data loss. In our case we were able to recover most of it, the only gap being some data that was entered onto the site over the course of the day today, which unfortunately includes most of today’s reader comments. Where appropriate, I’ll plan on emailing persons who left comments to propose re-posting them, but there are no guarantees that comments responding to other comments will wind up in the right order.

Most popular posts October-December 2013

Our most heavily trafficked post in October 2013 was “USPS To Destroy ‘Just Move’ Stamps Over Safety Concerns’” The most commented-on posts were “Update: $2.2 M verdict reinstated for client whose chair collapsed at law firm,” “A slippery slope to polygamy?” and the USPS post above.

November’s most clicked-on post was “San Rafael, Calif. passes own-home smoking ban.” The most commented-on posts were that post, “NYC: ‘Meet the seemingly unfirable female firefighter’,” and “FDA orders 23andMe to shut down home genome test.”

The most visited post in December was “Drunk driver will recover $6.6 million from two Pennsylvania bars.” (In fact, by being linked on Reddit, it brought us the highest number of visitors of any day in the site’s history, since moving onto WordPress at least.) The most commented-on posts, subject to change should there be some last-minute wave of comments, were “Megan McArdle: ‘Lead paint verdict sets dangerous precedent’,” “Liberty cake wrecks, cont’d,” and the drunk driver post above.