Posts tagged as:

don’t

November 2 roundup

by Walter Olson on November 2, 2011

  • A request for anti-SLAPP lawyers in Maine and Maryland [Popehat]
  • “Gallup: Government Regulation the Top Concern Among Small Business Owners” [NRO Corner] Almost as if in rebuttal to claims from Treasury economist [Business Roundtable]
  • Foreclosure law firm in upstate NY under fire after pics posted of its Halloween party [Nocera, Mystal]
  • “GAO Report Details Secrecy Of Asbestos Trusts” [Dan Fisher, Forbes] Crown Cork & Seal seeks successor-liability bill in Massachusetts [Eagle-Tribune]
  • Case against FMCSA’s rule change on truckers’ hours-of-service [Marc Scribner, CEI]
  • Richard Epstein on John Paul Stevens as justice and, now, author [Hoover]
  • Feds say lawyer who advised giant theft ring was partly paid in chic shoes and other designer gear [ABA Journal]

July 29 roundup

by Walter Olson on July 29, 2011

  • Don’t: “Lawyer Disbarred for Verbal Aggression to Pay $9.8M Fine for Hiding Cash Overseas” [Weiss, ABA Journal]
  • Loser-pays might help: “Dropped malpractice lawsuits cost legal system time and money” [Liz Kowalczyk, Boston Globe]
  • “Kim Kardashian and the Problem With ‘Celebrity Likeness’ Lawsuits” [Atlantic Wire]
  • Kim Strassel on the Franken-spun Jamie Leigh Jones case [WSJ]
  • Peggy Little interviews Prof. Lester Brickman (Lawyer Barons) on new Federalist Society podcast;
  • Worse than Wisconsin? “Weaponizing” recusal at the Michigan Supreme Court [Jeff Hadden, Detroit News]
  • New York legislature requires warning labels for sippy cups [NYDN]

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If prosecutors are to be believed, Paul Bergrin not only defrauded lenders on a grand scale but “set up witnesses to be murdered before they could testify against his clients”. “I can’t have some [expletive] lawyer in suspenders and I’m supposed say thanks because he got my sentence down to twenty years,” said one murder-rap defendant client. “I’m paying top dollar, and I demand legal brilliance. Someone who will consider all the options.” [New York magazine]

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June 7 roundup

by Walter Olson on June 7, 2011

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Pending further disciplinary action, the State Bar of California suspended the right to practice of Michael Pines, whose exploits had garnered considerable press attention [Amanda Bronstad, NLJ; earlier here and here]

Really bad lawyer conduct? Or only medium? “The State Bar of Arizona is looking to throw the book at a Phoenix attorney who told a client that she was channeling his dead wife, then allegedly lied about it during an unrelated disciplinary proceeding.” [National Law Journal]

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Don’t

by Walter Olson on November 24, 2009

A bright-line rule in legal ethics: don’t order that witnesses be killed [Philadelphia Inquirer, WSJ Law Blog on prosecutors' allegations in a case against New Jersey criminal defense lawyer Paul Bergrin]

Doing that sort of thing is never a good idea, and now it’s drawn a three-year sentence for obstruction of justice for a former vice president at a Cambridge, Mass.-based biotech company. He’s appealing the sentence as excessive. [AP, Boston Globe, Boston Herald]

A South Carolina lawyer with expertise in “asset protection” and his associate have pleaded not guilty to federal charges over their alleged roles in an arrangement to do that; an Aiken, S.C. lawyer “pled guilty on September 18 to conspiracy to commit mail fraud and money laundering for his role in the scheme.” [WISTV.com, Columbia State]

Don’t

by Walter Olson on October 5, 2009

Don’t gamble away your clients’ $2 million class action settlement on stock market day trading and lose it [Sandeep Baweja of Orange County, Calif., who has agreed to plead guilty; earlier]

A “judge ordered the Office of Disciplinary Counsel to lock [Allen] Feingold out of his offices” after he went on practicing law notwithstanding his suspension and eventual disbarment, even going so far as to use another lawyer’s letterhead and electronic-filing code without his permission. That was aside from the question of whether he’d earlier attempted to choke, or only attempted to strike, a judge who’d ruled against him on an arbitration matter. [Above the Law, Legal Intelligencer, AmLaw Daily]

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TaxProf: “The Tax Court yesterday denied a New York tax lawyer’s claimed $100,000+ medical expense deduction for the costs of prostitutes and pornographic material.” Earlier here. More: Gothamist last year on related state-tax enforcement action (“The state auditor also argued that ‘in addition to being illegal in New York State, these expenses are not substantiated with receipts.’”

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Himself for a client dept.

by Walter Olson on September 1, 2009

According to U.S. Justice Department and Colorado bar authorities, Denver immigration lawyer Ravi Kanwal was himself in the United States unlawfully. [Legal Profession Blog via Ambrogi, Legal Blog Watch]

Don’t

by Walter Olson on August 14, 2009

If you’re a judge annoyed at a court worker’s parking her car in a restricted parking space at the courthouse, don’t take it upon yourself to let the air out of her tires [Maryland circuit court judge Robert Nalley, who's stepping down from an administrative post but not from the bench after conceding the bit of self-help in question; Washington Post]

Don’t

by Walter Olson on July 18, 2009

…steal $2.2 million by pocketing, e.g., clients’ medical and car-crash liability settlements and a real estate escrow [attorney Marc A. Bernstein, 54, of Bernstein & Bernstein LLP in Manhattan, according to two indictments; Mortgage Fraud Reporter, NY Post; license suspended in April; earlier]

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Before asking a federal judge to grant preliminary approval for a class action settlement with Ameritrade over alleged privacy breaches, make sure that your “client,” the class representative, isn’t going to tell the court he opposes the settlement. In re TD Ameritrade Account Holder Litigation, Case No. C 07-2852 VRW (N.D. Cal.) ($1.87M for the attorneys, coupons for the class.).

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Don’t

by Walter Olson on June 10, 2009

Attention, lawyers in the U.K. (and elsewhere): “billing for time spent actually having sex with the client is definitely frowned upon”. [Lowering the Bar, Times Online]

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June 7 roundup

by Walter Olson on June 7, 2009

  • Pennsylvania Department of Labor launches probe on whether reality-TV show “Jon & Kate Plus 8″ violates child labor laws [Pennsylvania Labor & Employment Blog, Hirsch/Workplace Law Prof via Ohio Employer's Law]
  • Dispute over termination of Navy aircraft contract called “Jarndyce v. Jarndyce of U.S. legal system” [WSJ Law Blog]
  • Medical tourism, cont’d: “It appears that ‘we’re easier to sue’ is the uniquely American defense to medicine outsourcing.” [KevinMD]
  • New Oklahoma law protects farmers from neighbors’ suits complaining of nuisance from farm activity [Enid, Okla., News]
  • For unusually bad advice on how to save GM and Detroit, Michael Moore as usual comes through [Popehat]
  • Lawyer reprimanded for telling party she should be cut up, shipped overseas [NJLJ, ABA Journal]
  • Call for reform of UK laws banning press interviews of jurors after verdict [Times Online first, second articles and commentary]
  • Coming soon: campaign against depiction of smoking in Raymond Chandler books, Edward Hopper paintings [CEI "Open Market"]

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